Area Code 980 Location

    area code

  • a number usually of 3 digits assigned to a telephone area as in the United States and Canada
  • The Chinese Telephone Code Plan is the way to group telephone numbers in the mainland of the People’s Republic of China. Land lines and mobile phones follow different systems: land lines use area codes, while mobile phones do not.
  • A three-digit number that identifies one of the telephone service regions into which the US, Canada, and certain other countries are divided and that is dialed when calling from one area to another
  • A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunications to allocate telephone numbers to subscribers and to route telephone calls in a telephone network. A closed numbering plan, such as found in North America, imposes a fixed total length to numbers.

    location

  • localization: a determination of the place where something is; “he got a good fix on the target”
  • a point or extent in space
  • placement: the act of putting something in a certain place
  • The action or process of placing someone or something in a particular position
  • A particular place or position
  • An actual place or natural setting in which a film or broadcast is made, as distinct from a simulation in a studio

    980

  • The 980s decade ran from January 1, 980, to December 31, 989.
  • * Otto II renounces his claim to Lorraine. * The Viking ring castle of Trelleborg is constructed in Denmark.

area code 980 location

area code 980 location – DeWalt DCD980L2

DeWalt DCD980L2 20-Volt Max Li-Ion Premium 3.0 Ah Drill Driver Kit
DeWalt DCD980L2 20-Volt Max Li-Ion Premium 3.0 Ah Drill Driver Kit
DEWALT’S DCD980L2 20-volt max lithium-ion premium 3.0 Ah drill/driver kit comes equipped with patented technology and innovative features that make it ideal for commercial and residential builders, remodelers, carpenters, woodworkers, electricians, and plumbers. Its extreme durability, performance, and comfort allow users to match the tool to the task at hand, increasing its flexibility for a variety of applications regardless of speed, torque, or power.
At a Glance
DCD980L2 20-Volt Max
Lithium-Ion Premium
Drill/Driver Kit
At a Glance:

Compact and ergonomic design that doesn’t compromise on power

Three-speed transmission delivers 0-600 RPM; 0-1,250 RPM; and 0-2,000 RPM

1/2-inch metal ratcheting chuck with carbide inserts helps to reduce bit slippage

Drill comes with 3-year limited warranty, 1-year free service contract, and 90-day money-back guarantee

Battery packs come with 3-year free service contract

At a Glance

DCD980L2 20-volt max lithium-ion premium 3.0 Ah drill/driver
The DCD980L2 20-volt max lithium-ion premium 3.0 Ah drill/driver is compact and ergonomic for user comfort (view larger).
DCD980L2 20-volt max lithium-ion premium 3.0 Ah drill/driver
The DCD980L2 kit includes a 360-degree side handle for additional control (view larger).
Power
DEWALT-designed electronics have been built into the DCD980L2’s switch to provide maximum life for the tools and batteries by helping to protect them from overheating, overloading, and deep discharge during use. The 20-volt’s lithium-ion batteries provide up to 35 percent more runtime than existing 18-volt lithium-ion battery technology. The included charger has dual voltage capabilities, and it is compatible with both 12-volt max and 20-volt max DEWALT lithium-ion batteries. Plus, the drill’s high-power, high-efficiency motor delivers 535 unit watts out of maximum power for superior performance in all drilling and fastening applications.

Speed
The drill/driver’s patented three-speed (0-600 RPM; 0-1,250 RPM; and 0-2,000 RPM), all-metal transmission allows users to select the appropriate speed for the job at hand and provides a significant advantage for applications that cannot be done at high speed because of torque requirements. While other drills may have to be set to the slowest speed, the DEWALT 20-volt max lithium-ion premium 3.0 Ah drill has a middle speed setting that is more than twice as fast for tasks like drilling larger ship auger bits.

Durability
A heavy-duty 1/2-inch metal ratcheting chuck with carbide inserts provides superior bit-gripping strength—reducing slippage during high-torque applications—thus providing longer tool life. And the all-metal gear housing meets the demand for extreme toughness.

Comfort and Convenience
The premium drill’s design incorporates a slim handle that extends user comfort during long jobs, and DEWALT’s engineering and design team adjusted the product footprint and weight allocation for ideal balance and a lightweight feel. The bright built-in LED work light above the trigger has a 20-second delay that improves visibility in dimly lit spaces.

About DEWALT’s 20-Volt Max Lithium-Ion Tools
DEWALT’s line of 20-volt max lithium-ion tools features improvements in engineering and design to provide the performance, the ergonomics, and the innovation that contractors require. The new line consists of 11 tools, two lithium ion batteries, and two battery chargers, as well as a number of combo kits.

What’s in the Box
One DEWALT DCD980L2 20-volt max lithium-ion premium 3.0 Ah drill/driver kit including the drill/driver, a one-hour charger, two 20-volt max 3.0 Ah lithium-ion batteries, one 360-degree side handle, and one hard plastic storage and carrying case.

DCD980L2 20-volt max lithium-ion premium 3.0 Ah drill/driverDCD980L2 20-volt max lithium-ion premium 3.0 Ah drill/driverDCD980L2 20-volt max lithium-ion premium 3.0 Ah drill/driver
DEWALT’s DCD980L2 20-volt max lithium-ion premium 3.0 Ah drill/driver kit includes features and accessories that make it easy to tackle a variety of tasks
(click each to enlarge).

Royal Air Force Boeing Chinook HC2 (UK variant)

Royal Air Force Boeing Chinook HC2 (UK variant)
The Boeing Chinook is a tandem rotor helicopter operated by the Royal Air Force. A series of variants based on the United States Army’s Boeing CH-47 Chinook, the RAF Chinook fleet is the largest outside the United States. RAF Chinooks have seen extensive service including fighting in the Falklands War, peace-keeping commitments in the Balkans, and action in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars
The Chinook HC2 aircraft, normally based at RAF Odiham, provides heavy-lift support and transport across all branches of the British armed forces, and is supported by the smaller, medium-lift helicopters such as the AgustaWestland Merlin HC3 and the Westland Puma HC1, based at RAF Benson and RAF Aldergrove.
Design and development
Chinook HC1
In March 1967 an order was placed for fifteen Chinook HC1s, standing for Helicopter, Cargo Mark 1, for the Royal Air Force to replace the Bristol Belvedere.[3] This original HC1 variant was to be based on the CH-47B but the order was cancelled in a review of defence spending in November 1967.
UK Chinook procurement ambitions were revived in 1978 with an announced requirement for a new heavy-lift helicopter to replace the Westland Wessex. Thirty Chinooks were ordered at a price of US$200 million. These helicopters, comparable to the CH-47C with Lycoming T55-L-11E engines, were again designated Chinook HC1, and entered service in December 1980. Eight more HC1s were delivered from 1984 to 1986 with the CH-47D’s Lycoming T55-L-712 turboshafts.
The replacement of the HC1′s metal rotor blades with aluminium and glass fibre composite rotor blades saw these aircraft designated Chinook HC1B. All surviving aircraft were later returned to Boeing and updated to the Chinook HC2 standard for further service within the RAF.[8]
Chinook HC2
The US Army’s next generation Chinook, the CH-47D, entered service in 1982. Improvements from the CH-47C included upgraded engines, composite rotor blades, a redesigned cockpit to reduce pilot workload, redundant and improved electrical systems, an advanced flight control system (FCS) and improved avionics.[9] The RAF returned their original HC1s to Boeing for upgrading to CH-47D standard, the first of which returned to the UK in 1993.
Three additional HC2 Chinooks were ordered with delivery beginning in 1995. Another six were ordered in 1995 under the Chinook HC2A designation; the main difference between these and the standard HC2 was the strengthening of the front fuselage to allow the fitting of an aerial refueling probe in future.
One Argentine CH-47C was captured during the Falklands War, and used by the RAF as a training aid. The rear fuselage was later used to repair a crashed RAF Chinook in 2003.
In 2006, the retirement dates for the HC2 and HC2A fleets were scheduled for 2015 and 2025 respectively, however if planned upgrades were made both types could expect to be flying until 2040.
Chinook HC3
One of the most incompetent procurements of all time.
Edward Leigh, then Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee.
Eight Chinook HC3s were ordered in 1995 as dedicated special forces helicopters, effectively low-cost variants of the US Army’s MH-47E. The HC3s include improved range, night vision sensors and navigation capability. The eight aircraft were to cost ?259 million and the forecast in-service date was November 1998. Although delivered in 2001, the HC3 could not receive airworthiness certificates as it was not possible to certify the avionics software. The avionics were unsuitable due to poor risk analysis and necessary requirements omitted from the procurement contract. The Times claimed that the Ministry of Defence planned to perform software integration itself, without Boeing’s involvement, in order to reduce costs. While lacking certification, the helicopters were only permitted to fly in visual meteorological conditions and subsequently stored in climate controlled hangars.
After protracted negotiations to allow them to enter service, Air Forces Monthly reported in November 2006 that the Defence Aviation Repair Agency would likely receive a contract to install the Thales avionics system on the Chinook HC3s. However, the Ministry of Defence announced in March 2007 that this so-called Fix to Field program would be cancelled, and instead it would revert the helicopters’ avionics to Chinook HC2/2A specification. programme was estimated to cost ?50-60 million. In June 2008, the National Audit Office issued a scathing attack on the MoD’s handling of the affair, stating that the whole programme was likely to cost ?500 million by the time the helicopters enter service. On 6 July 2009 the first of the eight modified Chinook HC3s made its first test flight at MoD Boscombe Down as part of the flight testing and evaluation phase of the HC3 "reversion" program.
[edit] Chinook HC4 / HC5 / HC6
A program to upgrade 46 Chinook HC2, HC2A and HC3 helicopters was initiated in December 2008. Called Project Julius, it includes new digital flight deck avionics based

Royal Air Force Chinook HC2

Royal Air Force Chinook HC2
The Boeing Chinook is a tandem rotor helicopter operated by the Royal Air Force. A series of variants based on the United States Army’s Boeing CH-47 Chinook, the RAF Chinook fleet is the largest outside the United States. RAF Chinooks have seen extensive service including fighting in the Falklands War, peace-keeping commitments in the Balkans, and action in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.
The Chinook HC2 aircraft, normally based at RAF Odiham, provides heavy-lift support and transport across all branches of the British armed forces, and is supported by the smaller, medium-lift helicopters such as the AgustaWestland Merlin HC3 and the Westland Puma HC1, based at RAF Benson and RAF Aldergrove.
Design and development[edit] Chinook HC1In March 1967 an order was placed for fifteen Chinook HC1s, standing for Helicopter, Cargo Mark 1, for the Royal Air Force to replace the Bristol Belvedere. This original HC1 variant was to be based on the CH-47B but the order was cancelled in a review of defence spending in November 1967,
UK Chinook procurement ambitions were revived in 1978 with an announced requirement for a new heavy-lift helicopter to replace the Westland Wessex. Thirty Chinooks were ordered at a price of US$200 million.[6] These helicopters, comparable to the CH-47C with Lycoming T55-L-11E engines, were again designated Chinook HC1, and entered service in December 1980. Eight more HC1s were delivered from 1984 to 1986 with the CH-47D’s Lycoming T55-L-712 turboshafts.
The replacement of the HC1′s metal rotor blades with aluminium and glass fibre composite rotor blades saw these aircraft designated Chinook HC1B. All surviving aircraft were later returned to Boeing and updated to the Chinook HC2 standard for further service within the RAF.
Chinook HC2
RAF Chinook HC2 in 2009The US Army’s next generation Chinook, the CH-47D, entered service in 1982. Improvements from the CH-47C included upgraded engines, composite rotor blades, a redesigned cockpit to reduce pilot workload, redundant and improved electrical systems, an advanced flight control system (FCS) and improved avionics.[9] The RAF returned their original HC1s to Boeing for upgrading to CH-47D standard, the first of which returned to the UK in 1993.
Three additional HC2 Chinooks were ordered with delivery beginning in 1995. Another six were ordered in 1995 under the Chinook HC2A designation; the main difference between these and the standard HC2 was the strengthening of the front fuselage to allow the fitting of an aerial refueling probe in future.
One Argentine CH-47C was captured during the Falklands War, and used by the RAF as a training aid. The rear fuselage was later used to repair a crashed RAF Chinook in 2003.
In 2006, the retirement dates for the HC2 and HC2A fleets were scheduled for 2015 and 2025 respectively, however if planned upgrades were made both types could expect to be flying until 2040.
Chinook HC3 One of the most incompetent procurements of all time.
Edward Leigh, then Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee.Eight Chinook HC3s were ordered in 1995 as dedicated special forces helicopters, effectively low-cost variants of the US Army’s MH-47E. The HC3s include improved range, night vision sensors and navigation capability. The eight aircraft were to cost ?259 million and the forecast in-service date was November 1998. Although delivered in 2001, the HC3 could not receive airworthiness certificates as it was not possible to certify the avionics software. The avionics were unsuitable due to poor risk analysis and necessary requirements omitted from the procurement contract. The Times claimed that the Ministry of Defence planned to perform software integration itself, without Boeing’s involvement, in order to reduce costs. While lacking certification, the helicopters were only permitted to fly in visual meteorological conditions and subsequently stored in climate controlled hangars.
After protracted negotiations to allow them to enter service, Air Forces Monthly reported in November 2006 that the Defence Aviation Repair Agency would likely receive a contract to install the Thales TopDeck avionics system on the Chinook HC3s. However, the Ministry of Defence announced in March 2007 that this so-called Fix to Field programme would be cancelled, and instead it would revert the helicopters’ avionics to Chinook HC2/2A specification. The programme was estimated to cost ?50-60 million. In June 2008, the National Audit Office issued a scathing attack on the MoD’s handling of the affair, stating that the whole programme was likely to cost ?500 million by the time the helicopters enter service. On 6 July 2009 the first of the eight modified Chinook HC3s made its first test flight at MoD Boscombe Down as part of the flight testing and evaluation phase of the HC3 reversion program.
Chinook HC4 / HC5 / HC6A programme to upgrade 46 Chinook HC2, HC2A and HC3 helicopters was initiated in December 2008. Called Project Julius, it includes new digital fligh